Category Archives: Parenting Articles

8 Vintage Parenting Trends That Boggle The Mind

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Every generation has their weird parenting trends. There’s something about a bad idea that has a way of captivating people. Every few years, someone with the word “doctor” in front of their name tells us to ignore all common sense, and parents, collectively, decide: What the hell, we’ll give it a shot.

It’s not just us – our parents did it too. And some of their ideas were downright insane.

[Read the full article at Parent.co]

Kids Need To Be Bad Before They Can Learn To Be Good

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“What if there’s something wrong with him?”

It’s a question that’s slipped through every parent’s mind at least once. It hit us hard when our son, after being told he couldn’t have any more candy, erupted into a fit of shrieking, kicking, and trying to claw at our faces until he drew blood.

He’d never done anything like this before, and it terrified us. This wasn’t the behavior of a boy whose parents knew what they were doing. It was the type of behavior that makes people in supermarkets scoff, or teachers call home and ask just what kind of environment, exactly, are you people raising this child in?

[Read the full article at Parent.co]

4 Little Things You Can Do Every Day To Make Your Kids Happier, More Positive People

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When the holidays come around, we’re all experts at teaching our kids to be grateful. We make our kids write thank-you notes for their grandparents and list off what they appreciate before a Thanksgiving Feast. Then we drop all of those habits the second the holidays are over.

But teaching a child to be grateful might be the best thing we can do for them. We all want our kids to grow up happy, but happiness isn’t something we can buy them or teach them to win. It comes from how they see the world and whether they focus on all the bad in their lives or on the good.

[Read the full article at Parent.co]

5 Things You Need To Know Before You Share That New Parenting Study

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The words “parenting study” provoke nothing but the most extreme of reactions. There are some parents who, when they see an article with the words “new study” in the title, get giddy and accept that here, at last, is the gospel truth that only someone without a brain would ignore.

Then there are other parents, who, when they see the word “study,” feel like – as one mother so eloquently put it – they “want to punch someone in the throat.” “Parenting experts” to them are condescending know-it-alls telling them how to raise kids they haven’t even met.

Everybody seems to be in one of those two camps, and there aren’t many people in the middle. But perhaps that’s where we should be.

[Read the full article at Parent.co]

Kindergarten Is Going To Completely Change Your Child – And That’s OK

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Kindergarten changes everything.

For five years, we’ve raised our child on our own. We taught him to walk and talk. We taught him about the world around him and how to tell right from wrong. We taught him everything he knows – and now everything is going to change.

Kindergarten, for many parents, is the first time you really hand your child off to someone else. Now, for eight hours a day, he will be surrounded by other teachers, other ideas, and other peers – influences that aren’t his parents.

It’s a terrifying thing to let go of that absolute control you have over your child. Suddenly, your child stops being the product of your parenting alone. From now on, their futures and their identities hinge on the public school system, on the teacher they get stuck with, and on the classmates who befriend them.

From here on out, kids’ friends are a bigger part of their life than ever. They’re going to change who your child is. They spend the better part of the day with your child, and they might even end up having more influence on who your child becomes than you do.

That’s a scary thought. It’s hard to let go and trust the world with your child but every parent has to do it. It helps to know that more good will come from this than you think.

[Read the full article at Parent.co]

Kindergarten Is Going To Completely Change Your Child – And That’s Okay

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Kindergarten changes everything.

For five years, we’ve raised our child on our own. We taught him to walk and talk. We taught him about the world around him and how to tell right from wrong. We taught him everything he knows – and now everything is going to change.

Kindergarten, for many parents, is the first time you really hand your child off to someone else. Now, for eight hours a day, he will be surrounded by other teachers, other ideas, and other peers – influences that aren’t his parents.

It’s a terrifying thing to let go of that absolute control you have over your child. Suddenly, your child stops being the product of your parenting alone. From now on, their futures and their identities hinge on the public school system, on the teacher they get stuck with, and on the classmates who befriend them.

From here on out, kids’ friends are a bigger part of their life than ever. They’re going to change who your child is. They spend the better part of the day with your child, and they might even end up having more influence on who your child becomes than you do.

That’s a scary thought. It’s hard to let go and trust the world with your child but every parent has to do it. It helps to know that more good will come from this than you think.

[Read the full article at Parent.co]

The Future of Science Needs Our Daughter’s Perspectives

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When she was in high school, my mother-in-law took an aptitude test. She had an exceptional mind for engineering, the test said, scoring in the 99th percentile for math and science. As a woman who excelled in science, her guidance counselor told her, she would make a perfect librarian.

It’s a moment that changed her life. When the door to a career in science was closed on her face and she was told to pursue a woman’s job instead, she listened. She never became an engineer, but every time she tinkered with a broken household appliance, she would wonder what might have been.

Today, women have a lot more opportunities than our parents’ generation did, but that doesn’t mean their prospects are completely equal. Even with laws that promise equal careers, women have to struggle against the weight of history.

[Read the full article at Listverse.com]